08 Jan 2010 @ 6:00 AM 

Friday Minute
No. 6 | January 8, 2010

Celluloid Heroes

Our theme this week
The celluloid heroes of “Celluloid Heroes”

Featured this week
Monday         —   Greta Garbo
Tuesday         —   Rudolph Valentino / Béla Lugosi
Wednesday    —   Bette Davis / George Sanders
Thursday        —   Mickey Rooney

Marilyn Monroe

But please don’t tread on dearest Marilyn
‘Cause she’s not very tough
She should have been made of iron or steel
But she was only made of flesh and blood

The essentials
marilyn_monroeScreen legend, gifted actress, talented comedian, sex goddess—Marilyn Monroe was the most famous woman of the 20th century.  She had legions of fans around the world, enamored with her beauty and charms, profoundly saddened when she died so young.  Her many admirers included the high and famous.  Joe DiMaggio and Arthur Miller loved her and married her.  Andy Warhol put her brilliant images on canvas.  Elton John sang a wistful elegy to her.  Norman Mailer wrote a book about her.  Marilyn Monroe likely has had more words written about her than any other star in the history of movies.  There is little to add here, but I’ll quote one sentence from Owen Meany, the John Irving character, who finds a parallel between her and America:  She was just like our whole country—not quite young anymore, but not old either; a little breathless, very beautiful, maybe a little stupid, looking for something—I think she wanted to be good.

A native of Los Angeles, Marilyn Monroe (then Norma Jeane Baker) grew up in foster homes during the Depression.  She modeled and appeared in a few small movie roles in the ’40s.  She played the young mistress with expensive tastes in John Huston’s crime classic The Asphalt Jungle (1950).   It was a small part, but won good reviews, and led to another small but well-received performance in All About Eve (she’s the third “celluloid hero” of the week in that film).  George Sanders introduces her as a graduate of the Copacabana School of Dramatic Art; in Some Like It Hot (1959), she claims to have spent three years at the Sheboygan Conservatory of Music.  In contrast to her “dumb blonde” image, she did in fact attend UCLA and study at the Actors Studio.  Lee Strasberg said that among the many hundreds of actors who were his students, Monroe and Marlon Brando were the “only two that [stood] out way above the rest.”  Soon, her film roles got bigger as she worked with some leading directors:  Monkey Business (1952, Howard Hawks), Clash by Night (1953, Fritz Lang), Niagara (1953, Henry Hathaway).  In 1953 she starred as gold digger Lorelei Lee in Hawks’s adaptation of Gentlemen Prefer Blondes, a critical and commercial success, and especially memorable for Monroe’s iconic performance of “Diamonds Are a Girl’s Best Friend.”  Then came How to Marry a Millionaire (1953) and There’s No Business Like Show Business (1954).  Despite difficulties on the set, The Seven-Year Itch (1955), directed by Billy Wilder, showcased Monroe’s comedic talents and contained the unforgettable shot on the subway grate, with the wind from the passing train blowing Monroe’s white dress high above her knees.  She gave a memorable performance of “That Old Black Magic” as the saloon singer in Bus Stop (1956), winning raves from critics (“Marilyn Monroe has finally proved herself an actress,” said Bosley Crowther in the New York Times).  In 1957 she made The Prince and the Showgirl, costarring and directed by Lawrence Olivier.  Already a huge star, her next film was one for the ages.  Some Like It Hot was directed by Wilder and starred Tony Curtis and Jack Lemmon in classic performances as a couple of cross-dressing musicians on the run from the mob.  Monroe plays Sugar Kane Kowalczyk, the beautiful, ditzy singer who always gets “the fuzzy end of the lollipop” and who falls for the faux oil baron played by Curtis.  It’s a movie filled with great moments, not the least of them Monroe singing several numbers including “I Wanna Be Loved by You.”  The Misfits (1961), though not a hit, is generally well-regarded by critics.  It is a sad milestone of a film:  Monroe’s last completed performance, the final film of her onetime idol Clark Gable, who died days after production ended, and one of the last films of Montgomery Clift.  Not to mention, her marriage with Miller was breaking up while they were filming his script.  Marilyn Monroe died in August 1962 in Los Angeles at the age of 36.  Cause of death was an overdose of barbiturates, with circumstances (accident, suicide, murder) that have never been fully explained.  Her fame did not die with her.  She lives on in the memories of her fans, many of them born in the decades since she passed.  As that song from the Kinks goes, “celluloid heroes never really die.”

Beyond the final credits
Andy Warhol’s Marilyn Diptych of 1962, based on a publicity still from Niagara,  may be the most famous Monroe image by an artist, but it’s hardly the only one.  Here are some of the other artists who’ve featured Monroe in their work:  Willem de Kooning (1954), James Rosenquist (1961), Richard Hamilton (1966), Salvador Dalí (1967), Robert Rauschenberg (1967), and Barbara Kruger (1997).


Gentleman Prefer Blondes (1953)
“Diamonds Are a Girl’s Best Friend”
Marilyn Monroe


Quote of Note
“It wasn’t the airplanes. It was beauty killed the beast.”
— Carl Denham (Robert Armstrong, 1933; Jack Black, 2005), King Kong

…58…59…60.

Posted By: John Farmer
Last Edit: 06 Jan 2010 @ 09:22 PM

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 07 Jan 2010 @ 6:00 AM 

Thursday Minute
No. 5 | January 7, 2010

Celluloid Heroes

Our theme this week
The celluloid heroes of “Celluloid Heroes”

Featured this week
Monday         —   Greta Garbo
Tuesday         —   Rudolph Valentino / Béla Lugosi
Wednesday    —   Bette Davis / George Sanders

Mickey Rooney

And if you stamped on Mickey Rooney
He would still turn round and smile

The essentials
mickey_rooneyWhere do you begin with Mickey Rooney?  Let’s start with now.  Mickey Rooney is still living—so in one respect, he’s unlike the other performers featured this week.  Not only is Rooney living, he’s still working, and working a lot for a man who’ll turn 90 in September, with more than ten films and more than 20 credits in all over the past decade.  Not bad for a guy who got his start in movies during the silent era.

The son of vaudeville performers, Rooney grew up on stage and started in movies at an age most kids start school.  During the ’20s and ’30s, he appeared as Mickey McGuire in dozens of shorts (first silents, then talkies).  His antics at a table tennis competition caught the eye of David O. Selznick, who cast him as the younger version of Clark Gable in the 1934 crime story Manhattan Melodrama (notably, the movie that gangster John Dillinger had seen the night he was killed leaving the theater).  The next year Rooney was Puck in A Midsummer Night’s Dream, an indelible performance that has garnered a mix of reactions:  “a masterpiece” (David Thomson), “exceedingly obstreperous” (J. Hoberman).  In 1937 he appeared in A Family Affair, an MGM film whose success launched the “Andy Hardy” series, which in turn vaulted Rooney to a new level of popularity.  He played the adventurous young man who would get himself into one small-town jam after another, often finding a solution after a talk with his stern-but-kind father, Judge Hardy.  Also in 1937, Rooney made Thoroughbreds Don’t Cry, the first of ten films with his song-and-dance partner Judy Garland (she appeared in three of the Andy Hardy films).  Their comedy-musical hits included Babes in Arms (1939), for which Rooney became the first teenager nominated for an Oscar, and Babes on Broadway (1941).  Boys Town (1938) earned Rooney critical acclaim as the tough bully Whitey Marsh, who keeps running away but is saved in the end by Father Flanagan (Spencer Tracy), the priest who believes “there is no such thing as a bad boy.”  Rooney’s energy and talent won favor with audiences.  He was among the top ten box office draws each year from 1938 to 1943, and number one among Hollywood stars in 1939, 1940, and 1941.  He played the horse trainer Mi Taylor in National Velvet (1944), opposite the young Elizabeth Taylor.  He returned to Hollywood after the war, and in adult roles he never was as big a star as he had been in his youth.  He did became a fine character actor, though, working steadily in the decades since.  Some of his notable performances include the scary, manic lead in the Don Siegel-directed Baby Face Nelson (1957) and the trainer of a washed-up boxer in Requiem for a Heavyweight (1962).  He was the completely over-the-top landlord Mr. Yunioshi in Breakfast at Tiffany’s (1961), an ethnic characterization that drew criticism (in the years since, director Blake Edwards expressed regrets and producer Richard Shepherd apologized).  Rooney earned good reviews and an Oscar nomination for the 1979 adaptation of The Black Stallion.  It was his fourth acting nomination.  He was awarded a special “juvenile” Oscar in 1938 and an Honorary Oscar in 1983.  Rooney has also worked on Broadway and in television, and he’s written several books.  Through his long career, mixed in with some work that’s no doubt forgettable, he’s turned in many memorable performances, comedic and dramatic.  Mickey Rooney is an important figure in movie history, a star of the first order.  Not to mention, he’s not done yet.

Beyond the final credits
Mickey Rooney kept the Hollywood press busy, marrying famously and often.  His first marriage was to teen bride Ava Gardner, and he married eight times in all.  Perhaps he finally learned the trick.  He and his current wife, Jan, have been married since 1978, a longer stretch than all of Rooney’s previous marriages combined.


Strike Up the Band (1940)
Mickey Rooney, Judy Garland


MAD FilmFest 101 Hint:
Two of the people who are namesakes of presidents were major league ballplayers.  (It’ll help to know their full name.)


Award Spotlight
Presented each year since 1948 by the British Academy of Film and Television Arts, the BAFTA awards are Britain’s equivalent of the Oscars.  The first three films to win Best British Film were Odd Man Out, The Fallen Idol, and The Third Man.  All three were directed by Carol Reed.

…58…59…60.

Posted By: John Farmer
Last Edit: 07 Jan 2010 @ 12:43 AM

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 06 Jan 2010 @ 12:00 AM 

Wednesday Minute
No. 4 | January 6, 2010

Celluloid Heroes

Our theme this week
The celluloid heroes of “Celluloid Heroes”

Featured this week
Monday         —   Greta Garbo
Tuesday         —   Rudolph Valentino / Béla Lugosi

Bette Davis

But stand close by Bette Davis
Because hers was such a lonely life

The essentials
bette_davisBette Davis was one of the preeminent film actors of the 20th century.  She was talented and unafraid, both onscreen and off, fighting for the roles she played and in her roles fighting for what her characters believed they deserved.  She poured her considerable energy into the performances she gave, often at a caliber worthy of awards.

Davis was a Yankee from Massachusetts.  She arrived on Broadway in 1929, and a year later, in Hollywood.  After several films with Universal, she signed with Warner Bros. in 1932.  She won raves from the critics for her portrayal of the unsympathetic Mildred Rogers in the 1934 adaptation of Maugham’s Of Human Bondage.  A write-in campaign was launched to earn her an Oscar when she was left off the ballot.  It wasn’t successful, but the outcry over her snub led to permanent change in the Academy rules for nominating actors; no longer would a small committee decide.  She won Best Actress the following year, for Dangerous, and called the award a “consolation prize.”  After The Petrified Forest (1936), costarring Humphrey Bogart in his firm notable role, she was cast in a series of films she considered mediocre.  She tried, unsuccessfully, to get out of her contract with Warner Bros.  Jezebel (1938), directed by William Wyler (with whom Davis was romantically linked), was a return to success.  She won another Oscar for her memorable performance as a spoiled Southern belle, not unlike the big role the next year of Scarlett O’Hara, for which she was a fan favorite though she did not win the part.  In 1939 she made the tearjerker Dark Victory (again with Bogart), in a role she’d later claim was the favorite of her career.  Other successes followed, including All This, and Heaven Too (1940); The Little Foxes (1941), her third and final film with Wyler; Now, Voyager (1942), with the famous final scene with Paul Henreid; and Mr. Skeffington (1944), notable for torments behind the scenes.  Some less successful years followed, with critics calling Beyond the Forest (1949) the end of her career.  Jack Warner finally released her from her contract.  She was not gone from the screen for long.  As Margo Channing in All About Eve (1950), the big Broadway star who falls victim to creeping age and a young, scheming rival, Davis was back on top.  The film is considered one of the greats, and her performance among the finest.  She worked less often in the years that followed yet did make some memorable films, including the psychological horror movies What Ever Happened to Baby Jane? (1962), opposite her rival of many years, Joan Crawford, and its sequel Hush… Hush, Sweet Charlotte (1964).  In her later years she worked in television, appeared on talk shows, and wrote books.  She died in 1989 at 81.  The epitaph on her tombstone reads:  “She did it the hard way.”

Beyond the final credits
Bette Davis was the first actress to win an AFI Life Achievement Award, and she was second among actresses on the AFI’s selection of “50 Greatest American Screen Legends” in 1999.  She was the first actor, male or female, to receive ten Academy Award nominations, winning two Oscars along the way.

George Sanders

If you covered him with garbage
George Sanders would still have style

The essentials
george_sandersGeorge Sanders was born in Saint Petersburg.  When he was 11, revolution came to Russia and his British parents moved the family to England.  He found regular work in films starting in the mid- to late-’30s, and during the war years he played the lead in two film series:   The Saint (five times as thief Simon Templar) and The Falcon (four times as detective Gay Lawrence).  Sanders worked with top directors during the ’40s, including Alfred Hitchcock (Rebecca [1940], Foreign Correspondent [1942]), Fritz Lang (Man Hunt [1941]), and Otto Preminger (Forever Amber [1947]).  His memorable films included the gothic drama The Picture of Dorian Gray (1945) and the romantic fantasy The Ghost and Mrs. Muir (1947).  Sanders’s persona was the suave sophisticate with the mordant wit, and never was it put to better use than in Joseph L. Mankiewicz’s classic All About Eve (1950).  He gave a first-rate performance in the legendary role of Addison DeWitt, the critic and cynic who was able to see through rising star Eve Harrington (“You’re an improbable person, Eve, and so am I.  We have that in common.  Also, our contempt for humanity and inability to love and be loved, insatiable ambition, and talent.  We deserve each other.”)  Sanders won an Oscar, one of six wins for the film and the only one for acting (five actors were nominated, including Bette Davis).  Sanders worked steadily, if not so memorably, for years afterward, often as the charming heel.  He appeared in the first Pink Panther film, 1964’s A Shot in the Dark, and as Batman villain Mr. Freeze on television.  Sanders was married four times, twice to a Gabor sister (Zsa Zsa and Magda).  His health declined in his later years.  In April 1972, in a hotel in Spain, Sanders took an overdose of barbiturates, leaving behind this suicide note:  Dear World, I am leaving because I am bored. I feel I have lived long enough. I am leaving you with your worries in this sweet cesspool. Good luck.  (See the blog for more.)

Beyond the final credits
David Niven was friends with George Sanders and wrote about him in Bring on the Empty Horses, a collection of reminiscences published in 1975.  According to Niven, Sanders said in 1937, when Sanders was 31, that he would commit suicide at 65.  He was true to his word. 


All About Eve (1950)
Bette Davis, Gary Merrill, Anne Baxter


Man Hunt (1941)
George Sanders, Walter Pidgeon


Quote of Note
“Oh Jerry, don’t let’s ask for the moon. We have the stars.”
— Charlotte Vale (Bette Davis), Now, Voyager (1942)

…58…59…60.

Posted By: John Farmer
Last Edit: 06 Jan 2010 @ 12:33 AM

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 05 Jan 2010 @ 6:00 AM 

Tuesday Minute
No. 3 | January 5, 2010

Celluloid Heroes

Our theme this week
The celluloid heroes of “Celluloid Heroes”

Featured this week
Monday         —   Greta Garbo

Most of the time here at MAD  About Movies I’ll cover a single subject per day, but Ray Davies named more celluloid heroes than we have weekdays, so rather than skip anyone this first week we’ll double up today and tomorrow.  Today’s minute features two actors, hardly alike in many ways, though both born in the 19th century, natives of Europe, and émigrés to Hollywood in the early days of film.

Rudolph Valentino

Rudolph Valentino looks very much alive
And he looks up ladies’ dresses as they sadly pass him by

The essentials
rudolph-valentinoRudolph Valentino was a star of the silent era and never lived to see the advent of talkies.  He came from southern Italy and after a stop in Paris he arrived in New York, where he found work as a dancer and friendship with a Chilean heiress that turned out badly when her husband had him arrested.  One well-publicized court case and a fatal shooting later, Valentino sought escape from the scandal, traveling west.  He soon was making a career doing bit parts in Hollywood films, often cast as the heavy because of his so-called exotic looks and dark complexion.  The release of The Four Horsemen of the Apocalypse in 1921 brought him stardom.  It was a huge success, one of the biggest hits of the silent era, inspiring a craze for the tango and demand for Valentino as the consummate Latin lover.  He solidified his image as a romantic lead with The Sheik (1921), the film that he may be best remembered for, playing the role of the Arab who is the abductor and eventual lover of a British socialite.  Blood and Sand (1922) was another success, with Valentino as a bullfighter.  After a few underperforming films, Valentino gained a measure of critical acclaim, along with a return to box office success, with The Son of the Sheik (1926).  It would be his last film.  He died six weeks after it opened, the victim of appendicitis and other ailments.  He was 31.  Valentino’s death was mourned around the world.  More than 100,000 people lined the streets of New York for his funeral.  Polish actress Pola Negri, claiming to be his fiancée, collapsed at his coffin.  In the hysteria that followed his death, riots broke out and suicides of despondent fans were reported.

Beyond the final credits
Rudolph Valentino was buried in Hollywood.  As legend has it, he was visited every year on the anniversary of his death by a mysterious “woman in black.”  She came in a chauffeur-driven car, laid a bouquet of roses on his tomb, wiped away a tear, and left.  There was great intrigue about her identity.  Finally, years later, a woman named Ditra Flame came forward to explain that when she was young and very ill in the hospital, Valentino had visited her, telling her that she would recover and eventually outlive him, and he asked that she visit his grave so that he would not be alone.  Flame had many imitators, causing her to suspend her annual visits after a time, but she resumed them in her final years, before she died in 1984.

Béla Lugosi

Avoid stepping on Béla Lugosi
‘Cause he’s liable to turn and bite

The essentials
bela_lugosiBéla Lugosi was an actor in Hungary, first on stage and later in films.  After the Hungarian Revolution of 1919, he fled the country for Germany and eventually made his way to the U.S.  In addition to some film roles, he acted on Broadway, including a successful run in 1927 as the star of Dracula, which in turn led to work in Hollywood talkies.  Lon Chaney Sr. was set to star in the screen adaption of Dracula (1931), but with his death director Tod Browning cast Lugosi to play the vampire.  It was an iconic performance, a role for which Lugosi will always be remembered.  Lugosi had found success but was also typecast as a horror villain.  He appeared in The Black Cat (1934), The Raven (1935), and four other films with fellow horror icon Boris Karloff, including Son of Frankenstein (1938), with Lugosi memorably playing the hunchbacked assistant Ygor.  In Ninotchka the following year, he played a Russian commissar, a straight, supporting role, but in the 1940s he returned to horror.  In 1943 he finally played Frankenstein’s monster in Universal’s Frankenstein Meets the Wolf Man (with Lon Chaney Jr. as the Wolf Man), and in 1948 he reprised the role of Dracula for the comedy Abbott and Costello Meet Frankenstein (with Chaney Jr. again as the Wolf Man).  In his later years Lugosi had trouble finding work and trouble with drugs.  Ed Wood, a fan of Lugosi’s, hired the actor and gave him star billing again, although Wood’s films were hardly A-pictures.  Lugosi appeared in Glen or Glenda (1953), Wood’s docudrama about cross-dressing and transexuality, and Bride of the Monster (1955), in which the actor played a mad scientist who meets his end in an atomic explosion.  Lugosi suffered a fatal heart attack in 1956.  He was buried wearing a Dracula costume.

Beyond the final credits
Martin Landau played the role of Béla Lugosi in the 1994 film Ed Wood, winning the Academy Award for Best Supporting Actor.  It was one of the few occasions that an actor won an Oscar for portraying a real-life actor (Cate Blanchett as Katharine Hepburn is one other example).  Lugosi played many memorable roles and is one of the great names in the history of film, but he was never nominated for an Oscar himself.


The Son of the Sheik (1926)
Rudolph Valentino, Vilma Bánky


Dracula (1931)
Béla Lugosi, Edward Van Sloan


Point of View
“You will see that this little clicking contraption with the revolving handle will make a revolution in our life—in the life of writers.  It is a direct attack on the old methods of literary art.  We shall have to adapt ourselves to the shadowy screen and to the cold machine.  A new form of writing will be necessary.  I have thought of that and I can feel it coming.

“But I rather like it.  This swift change of scene, this blending of emotion and experience—it is much better than the heavy, long-drawn-out kind of writing to which we are accustomed.  It is closer to life.  In life, too, changes and transitions flash by before our eyes, and emotions of the soul are like a hurricane.  The cinema has divined the mystery of motion.  And that is greatness.”
— Count Leo Tolstoy (1828-1910)

…58…59…60.

Posted By: John Farmer
Last Edit: 22 Feb 2010 @ 09:12 PM

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 04 Jan 2010 @ 6:00 AM 

Monday Minute
No. 2 | January 4, 2010

Celluloid Heroes

Everybody’s a dreamer and everybody’s a star
And everybody’s in movies, it doesn’t matter who you are

Not very long ago I had an idea about creating this site and a few ideas for weekly themes.  I had no idea, though, where to begin.  Then, driving down the road one day, I heard the Kinks on the radio.  So here we are.

“Celluloid Heroes” is a wonderfully evocative song, one that inevitably gets stuck in my head for hours (if not days).  Years ago, when I first heard it, it had made an indelible impression on my teenage imagination.  I hadn’t seen many of the old movies then.  I didn’t know much about the old stars.  I hadn’t been to Hollywood Boulevard and seen their names written in concrete.  But I knew there was something great about the celluloid heroes that Ray Davies was singing about.  They were big.  They were different.  They had something beyond what normal existence would ever attain.  They had in fact attained the unattainable.  So it seemed.

There was of course more to it than that, which the song captures too.  There was an underside–not everything was greatness and glamour for the big Hollywood stars.  The lives they led were starkly and sadly different from the lives they played onscreen.  There was suffering that went with their striving.  Fame for them, as for others, was elusive, and once gotten, illusive.  “Success walks hand in hand with failure,” as the song goes.

Knowing all that doesn’t change much.  We may see the distance between the illusion and the reality but the illusion still looks rather appealing.  When Davies sings, “Everybody’s a dreamer,” who can say he’s not singing about them?

I wish my life was a nonstop Hollywood movie show
A fantasy world of celluloid villains and heroes
Because celluloid heroes never feel any pain
And celluloid heroes never really die.

Our theme this week
The celluloid heroes of “Celluloid Heroes”

Greta Garbo

Don’t step on Greta Garbo as you walk down the Boulevard
She looks so weak and fragile that’s why she tried to be so hard
But they turned her into a princess
And they sat her on a throne
But she turned her back on stardom
Because she wanted to be alone

The essentials
Greta GarboFor those of us who weren’t there at the time, it might not be possible to appreciate fully the magnitude of her stardom.  There is nothing, and no one, comparable today.  People of the day worshipped movie stars as the Greeks their gods, and no star shined brighter than Greta Garbo.

Garbo became a star in the silent era, first in Sweden, then Hollywood, and made several films with one of the great lovers of the silver screen,  John Gilbert, who was her lover too until she left him at the altar.  Garbo starred in the adaptation of Eugene O’Neill’s Anna Christie in 1930.  “Garbo talks!” was the campaign slogan, with her first words “Give me a whiskey, ginger ale on the side—and don’t be stingy, baby.”  In the decade that followed she gave some of the greatest performances ever filmed.  In 1932, as part of an all-star cast, she played a Russian ballerina in Grand Hotel.  She starred as the Swedish royal in Queen Christina (1933), appearing with Gilbert again after she fought to have him cast.  Then came Anna Karenina (1935) and the George Cukor-directed Camille (1936), the classic tearjerker adapted from Dumas about a high society courtesan doomed by consumption.  It may be the finest acting of Garbo’s career.  In 1939 she turned in a classic performance for Ninotchka, a comedy set in Paris about a no-nonsense Soviet envoy (“I’m interested in the Eiffel Tower from a technical standpoint”) who is sent by Moscow to complete a jewelry sale but discovers something else.

She made one more movie before she “turned her back on stardom.” She lived a quiet life, alone, in New York, until she died in 1990, leaving behind a legacy of unforgettable performances and the mystery of why she walked away.  Her acting, even by today’s standards, feels remarkably free and fluid, as if she were doing whatever she cared to, while others stuck to the script.  Garbo was an exquisite performer, at times a bit extravagant, and always the one to watch.

Beyond the final credits
“I want to be alone.”  That’s a line of Garbo’s from Grand Hotel, and for many years it came to be associated with the actress herself.  Over the decades many people wondered about that inscrutable decision by the star to leave her Hollywood career at the height of her fame.  “Why wonder?” she would say to a reporter toward the end of her life.  Garbo did comment once, though, about the quote she was most famous for:  “I never said, ‘I want to be alone.’  I only said, ‘I want to be let alone.’  There is all the difference.”  Perhaps that explains it.


Celluloid Heroes
The Kinks


Camille (1936)
Greta Garbo, Robert Taylor, Jessie Ralph


Quote of Note
“All playwrights should be dead for three hundred years!”
“That would solve none of their problems–because actresses never die!  The stars never die and never change!”
— Actress Margo Channing (Bette Davis) and playwright Lloyd Richards (Hugh Marlowe), All About Eve (1950)

…58…59…60.

Posted By: John Farmer
Last Edit: 03 Jan 2010 @ 09:08 PM

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